Posts Tagged ‘Make-up artist’

St Louis Photographer Josephine Havlak

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

I am proud to say that renowned St Louis, MO photographer, Josephine Havlak called one day last summer and wanted to know if I would do her makeup for her own portrait sitting…of course!! And how magnificent is this photo??? Josephine, thank you for your continual confidence & support over the last 15 years.   I have learned so much from you, especially about the importance of the correct lipstick for photos!  In her wedding blog, Wedding Chatter, Josephine advises that a Bride and her makeup artist need to work together to choose lipstick in “…shades that make your lips stand out from your face without being so loud a color that you notice nothing else about the face. ”  In other words, bright without being loud.  Best advice, ever.

Enhanced by Zemanta

eyelas curler throwdown

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

 

 

The first eyelash curler hit stores in the early twenties and sold for about $5. Since then, the handheld crimper has been reinvented many times over—in precious metals, with built-in heaters, in designer hues, and for much more than a five-spot. But ask any makeup artist and most will crown Shu Uemura’s Eyelash Curler the reigning champ. Beloved for its ability to lift and curl hairs without causing any pinching, the sleek tool hasn’t had much competition to contend with. Until now, that is. Enter Chanel’s new Precision Eyelash Curler, designed by the house’s visionary creative director of makeup Peter Philips. This chic contraption gets a few bonus points right off the bat, seeing as how it is stamped with the house’s iconic logo, but to see if it could truly unseat Shu’s gold standard, we put both to the test:

The Peak Performance: We can safely say that both tools worked extremely well during our mirror analysis, giving our lashes a nice whorl that lasted all day with a few coats of mascara. We found the looped handles super comfortable and experienced zero skin pinching between the two.

The Physical Form: Upon further inspection, we did notice that the Shu curler is heavier and has a rounder head, while the Chanel version is lighter with a broader and wider head. Why this matters: We found it easier to work with less bulk, and the extra inches in width helped capture those stumpy lashes at the outer and inner eye corners. Also, Chanel’s silicone pads seemed to be cushier than Shu’s, which allowed us to apply more pressure to squeeze and bend our lashes.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Yes, you need it.

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

 

 

 

 

It’s Called “Foundation” for a Reason
“Foundation is important for flawless-looking skin in photos. It doesn’t need to be applied all over the face. If you need less coverage, try spot-applying foundation to even out skin tone. Stay away from foundation with SPF, which may reflect the flash in photos.”

from New York Magazine Wedding Guide

Your Wedding Day Beauty To Do List

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

Plan ahead to avoid any wedding day beauty emergencies!

1. Designate a bridesmaid to be in charge of letting you know when you need a lipstick touch up.  She will also be in charge of your beauty essentials for the wedding and reception.

2. Always purchase the lipstick, lip liner and gloss your makeup artist will use on you.  This should be pre-determined at the trial run.  Tuck these away in a beautiful bridal clutch for your bridesmaid to take with her everywhere.  Don’t forget to include a mirror!

2. A week before the big day, find a mid sized, waterproof cosmetics bag.

3. Fill it with: breath mints, deoderant, Q-tips, eye makeup remover in a small refillable bottle for travel, a travel pack of tissues, eyeliner pencil (if you choose not use waterproof eyeliner), 2 safety pins, travel tooth brush and tooth paste, eye drops.

4. These are a must!

at Sephora: Bare Escentuals Liquid-Filled Cotton Swbas $5 for 24 swabs

Bare Minerals On The Spot Makeup Remover Swabs:  24 soft cotton swabs are individually filled with a pre-measured amount of gentle, skin-conditioning solution. Simply “snap” the swab at the colored ring to release the liquid into the tip. Easy, goof-proof removal and an alcohol-free formula complete with aloe vera and vitamin E for sensitive eyes.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Laura Mercier Faux Lashes

Saturday, September 25th, 2010

Laura MercierOne of my brides introduced me to these a few weeks ago.  I applied them with no hassles and they looked really beautiful, especially in the photo I snapped afterward.  They’re $18 and worth every cent.  If you are going to go the false lashes route, invest in some nice ones.  You can re-use them, and there is enough glue for a few applications.  I still stand by my preference for individual mini lashes, but I was pleasantly surprised by how  good these looked!

With the holiday season fast approaching, this might be something for a debutante to consider adding to her makeup routine for the night of the ball.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Eyebrows: The Good, the Bad and the Bride’s

Sunday, July 25th, 2010
Before filling in brows

Before

I think this is excellent advice contributed by artist Pamela Jeschonek  to the “Article” section of www.wedalert.com:

“…Ask any experienced Makeup Artist: the best makeup application in the world will not look its best if you have unmanaged eyebrows. The correct eyebrow shape can balance the face, make your eyes look larger and take years off your look.The trend right now is a natural, well-groomed eyebrow–a little thicker than in the recent past, but well-defined and soft. Gone are the days of pencil-thin eyebrows with a severe arch. Fairytale princesses had full, rounded eyebrows that gave them a soft, youthful, innocent look. Their wicked counterparts had severe, thin, highly arched brows that made them look mean, old and harsh. Definitely not the best look for a blushing bride!”

Brow filled in

After

via Eyebrows: The Good, the Bad and the Bride’s.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Insiders’ Guide: How to Choose Makeup Brushes

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010
Insiders' Guide: How to Choose Makeup Brushes


An Interview With Troy Surratt

New York City makeup artist Surratt has worked with Jennifer Lopez, Freida Pinto, and Ashlee Simpson.

The right brush doesn’t just make it easier to apply makeup; it can also allow you to be more precise. Here’s how to end up with a set that’s perfect for your needs.

· Cover your bases. Like most makeup artists, I prefer natural bristles for any brush used to apply powder. Not only are they the fluffiest and the softest, but they also have a cuticle—just like human hair—that really grabs pigment and holds on until you place it exactly where you want on the face. Blue squirrel is the best quality (hence, the most expensive), but pony hair, goat, and kolinsky sable are also good.

· Pick and choose. I think it’s more important to find the right brush for each task than to have a pretty matched set on your vanity. At minimum, you need four: a large powder brush, a slightly smaller fluffy brush (for blush, bronzer, and/or highlighter), an eye-shadow brush the size of a fingertip, and a smaller shadow brush (for smudging and blending). For each, look for a slightly domed shape—it rolls best across the skin with the least drag—and a nice fluffy texture, which deposits less pigment so you can be precise. (Synthetics are really only good for applying creams and liquids.)

· Go beyond the basics. If you prefer applying concealer with a brush, it’s best to have two: a slick Taklon one a half inch wide for under the eyes and a tiny, pointy one for blemishes. Foundation brushes tend to blob too much coverage right where they first touch your face; I prefer using a damp BeautyBlender sponge to stipple on makeup, because it allows for very sheer coverage.

· Buy the best brushes you can afford. I really believe that high-quality brushes are worth the price. They don’t just perform the best; they also make applying makeup a pleasure. If a $60 blush brush still gives you sticker shock, consider that it can easily last 20 years with proper maintenance. Once a month, mix warm water with a little shampoo (I like Aveda Shampure for this) for natural hair bristles or dish soap for synthetics. Swish the brushes around, rinse well, blot with paper towels, and lay them flat until they’re completely dry.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Airbrush Makeup – LoveToKnow Makeup

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009
Make-up artist backstage at the Lee Matthews s...

Image via Wikipedia

The Origins of Airbrush Makeup

Airbrush makeup application came about after Dina Ousley, a Hollywood actress and makeup artist that was tired of mediocre results, invented it over a decade ago to help people on screen look more flattering. Dinair© has hit a new wave of popularity recently in the entertainment world, as it is the only makeup that looks natural on the ever-revealing and detailed High Definition televisions. As pictures on the screens have gotten more detailed, the makeup and flawless look of the actors needs to step up as well.

Enhanced by Zemanta